Tagged: Polo shirt

Harry’s Suede Shirt-Jacket in The Enforcer

Clint Eastwood as "Dirty Harry" Callahan in The Enforcer (1976)

Clint Eastwood as “Dirty Harry” Callahan in The Enforcer (1976)

Vitals

Clint Eastwood as Insp. Harry Callahan, reassigned San Francisco inspector

San Francisco, Summer 1976

Film: The Enforcer
Release Date: December 22, 1976
Director: James Fargo
Costume Designer: Glenn Wright

Background

After all the romance of Valentine’s Day, Clint Eastwood is bringing some toughness back to BAMF Style as one of his most iconic characters, “Dirty Harry” Callahan. The third film in the “Dirty Harry” series, The Enforcer, finds Harry teamed up with tough rookie detective Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) against a gang of militant revolutionaries.

Harry begins the final day of his investigation roughing up a massage parlor, noting that it’s the sort of place where “for $75, you get to make it with a rubber dolly.” A tip leads him to a gunfight in a church which ultimately leads to a gunfight at Alcatraz. Continue reading

Ron Swanson’s Red Tiger Woods Polo

Nick Offerman as Ron Swanson on Parks and Recreation (Episode 2.08: "Ron and Tammy")

Nick Offerman as Ron Swanson on Parks and Recreation (Episode 2.08: “Ron and Tammy”)

Vitals

Nick Offerman as Ron Swanson, surly libertarian city parks director and jazz saxophonist

Pawnee, Indiana, Fall 2009

Series: Parks and Recreation
Episode: “Ron and Tammy” (Episode 2.08)
Air Date: November 5, 2009
Director: Troy Miller
Created by: Greg Daniels & Michael Schur
Costume Designer: Kelli Jones

Background

By design, little attention is paid to Ron Swanson’s clothing throughout Parks and Recreation. In fact, Ron’s style could best be summed up by saying he dresses like a non-threatening suburban dad, as opposed to Tom Haverford (Aziz Ansari), who basks in the show’s sartorial attention with his “Brooks Brothers Boys” suits. We even learn, in “Ron and Tammys” (Episode 4.02), that Ron has only spent $40 on clothes in the past five years.

That said, there is one thing that gets Ron to care about what he pulls out of his closet that morning… and that’s his activity from the night before. Continue reading

Rusty’s Gray Silk Suit in Ocean’s Twelve

Brad Pitt as "Rusty" Ryan in Ocean's Twelve (2004).

Brad Pitt as “Rusty” Ryan in Ocean’s Twelve (2004).

Vitals

Brad Pitt as Robert “Rusty” Ryan, hotel owner and international thief

Los Angeles and Rome, November 2004

Film: Ocean’s Twelve
Release Date: December 10, 2004
Director: Steven Soderbergh
Costume Designer: Milena Canonero
Pitt’s Costumer: Bruno de Santa

Background

Today’s installment of “Hey, I actually kinda enjoyed that movie!” features the Euro-flavored meat in Steven Soderbergh’s Ocean’s trilogy sandwich, Ocean’s Twelve. This blockbuster brought the whole gang back together again, adding nemeses on both sides of the law in the form of Catherine Zeta-Jones and Vincent Cassel.

After the theft of more than $160 million from his Vegas casino years earlier, ruthless mogul Terry Benedict (Andy Garcia) has spent plenty of time tracking down each team member of “Ocean’s Eleven”… a moniker that several of the team dispute. The last to be tracked down is Rusty Ryan, Danny Ocean’s smooth right hand whom we learn was actually considered the de facto leader by many of the group itself. Three and a half years after abandoning his girlfriend (CZJ) in Rome, Rusty is managing his own L.A. hotel and babysitting the washed-up Hollywood stars who bed down in it: “Jeez, Topher, you didn’t have to go all Frankie Muniz on me.”

Rusty is in the middle of the hedonistic Topher Grace situation when he gets that call from Benedict: “The last time we talked, you hung up on me.” Immediately realizing the significance of this greeting, Rusty gets into Neil McCauley mode as soon as he feels the heat. “You used nasty words,” Rusty responds, reverting to his cool persona and feeling comfort in the knowledge that Benedict isn’t able to see him desperately scrambling out of the building to his car(s). Of course, Rusty starts feeling the literal heat once Benedict triggers a bomb that detonates his favorite car, a ’63 Ford Falcon Futura convertible. Point taken. Continue reading

Michael Corleone’s Tan Check Suit and Day Cravat in Havana

Al Pacino as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Part II (1974).

Al Pacino as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Part II (1974).

Vitals

Al Pacino as Michael Corleone, cold and calculating Mafia boss

Havana, December 1958

Film: The Godfather Part II
Release Date: December 12, 1974
Director: Francis Ford Coppola
Costume Designer: Theadora Van Runkle

Background

Get into a smooth, summer relaxation mood for this Mafia Monday post that takes a look at Michael Corleone’s style for Hyman Roth’s birthday party in Havana… an appropriately timed post as my dad just returned from a trip to Cuba. (Yes, he brought back some Cohibas!)

What’d He Wear?

For all of his power and prestige, Michael Corleone has a very minimalist wardrobe, designed by the legendary Theadora Van Runkle (Bonnie and ClydeBullitt, and The Thomas Crown Affair are all among her repertoire.)

Michael makes good use of his four unique suits in The Godfather Part II, sometimes wearing a three-piece suit without a vest or, as we see in this case, adopting a more luxuriously casual look by swapping out the shirt and tie for a soft polo and a day cravat.

Although it appears a flat tan at the outset, this fully cut two-piece suit consists of a fine tan and cream plain weave glen check with teal blue on the outer check to create a teal windowpane effect throughout. Continue reading

The Last Run: Harry’s Navy Flannel Jacket

George C. Scott as Harry Garmes in The Last Run (1971).

George C. Scott as Harry Garmes in The Last Run (1971).

Vitals

George C. Scott as Harry Garmes, washed-up expatriate getaway driver

Portugal, Spring 1971

Film: The Last Run
Release Date: July 7, 1971
Director: Richard Fleischer
Wardrobe Supervisor: Annalisa Nasalli-Rocca

WARNING! Spoilers ahead!

Background

The Last Run is a relatively obscure crime flick from the early ’70s that starred George C. Scott, fresh off of his Oscar-winning turn in Patton, as a retired Bogart-esque criminal living the easy expatriate life in Europe à la Hemingway when he is called back for the proverbial “one last job”. Of course, anyone who’s ever seen any movie ever knows that “one last job” is never quite as easy as it sounds, and our aging protagonist finds himself facing more than he bargained for when driving escaped killer Paul Rickard (Tony Musante) and his girlfriend Claudie Scherrer (Trish Van Devere) across Portugal and Spain into France. Continue reading

Bond’s Covert Black Polo and Pants in Goldfinger

Sean Connery as James Bond in Goldfinger (1964).

Sean Connery as James Bond in Goldfinger (1964).

Vitals

Sean Connery as James Bond, British government agent and super spy

Geneva, Switzerland, Summer 1964

Film: Goldfinger
Release Date: September 18, 1964
Director: Guy Hamilton
Wardrobe Supervisor: Elsa Fennell

Background

James Bond: Do you expect me to talk?
Auric Goldfinger: No, Mr. Bond, I expect you to die!

For this 00-7th of October installment, BAMF Style is looking at the classic scene from the most iconic of Bond flicks, Goldfinger.

After successfully trailing the sinister Auric Goldfinger to his metallurgy plant in Geneva, James Bond chooses the dark of night to cover his covert investigations of the plant. He discovers Goldfinger’s gold smuggling enterprise and overhears his conversation with a Red Chinese agent about the mysterious “Operation Grand Slam”. Continue reading

Quantum of Solace – Bond’s Polo and Cream Jeans in Haiti

Daniel Craig as James Bond in Quantum of Solace (2008).

Daniel Craig as James Bond in Quantum of Solace (2008).

Vitals

Daniel Craig as James Bond, British government secret agent

Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Summer 2008

Film: Quantum of Solace
Release Date: October 31, 2008
Director: Marc Forster
Costume Designer: Louise Frogley

Background

Quantum of Solace ostensibly picks up minutes after Casino Royale left off (offering no feasible explanation of Bond’s radically different suit, though) and quickly establishes itself as the more action-oriented yin to the introspective Casino Royale origin story’s yang. The sequel was determined to feature every kind of chase possible; we are immediately treated to a pulse-pounding car chase along the mountains of Italy before the opening credits, and Bond finds himself engaged in a desperate foot chase through the town of Siena immediately following.

After a few relatively calm minutes of exposition in London, Bond is dispatched to follow up on a lead in Haiti where he engages in a deadly knife fight, motorbike chase, and – ultimately – a motorboat chase. All that remains is an air chase and, don’t worry, that’s coming later. Continue reading