Tagged: Plaid Sportcoat

Justified – Raylan’s Muted Navy-and-Brown Plaid Sportcoat

Timothy Olyphant as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens on <em>Justified</em> (Episode 1.05, "The Lord of War and Thunder")

Timothy Olyphant as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens on Justified (Episode 1.05, “The Lord of War and Thunder”)

Vitals

Timothy Olyphant as Raylan Givens, old school Deputy U.S. Marshal

Harlan County, Kentucky, Fall 2010

Series: Justified
Episodes:
– “The Lord of War and Thunder” (Episode 1.05, Director: Jon Avnet, Air Date: April 13, 2010)
– “Hatless ” (Episode 1.09, Director: Peter Werner, Air Date: May 11, 2010)
– “Cottonmouth” (Episode 2.05, Director: Michael Watkins, Air Date: March 9, 2011)
Creator: Graham Yost
Costume Designers: Ane Crabtree (Season 1) & Patia Prouty (Season 2)

Background

Justified took some time to find its footing at the beginning, developing the style of its characters as well as the show’s own format: would this be an episodic “case-of-the-week” procedural or more serial?

Luckily, the show found its place at the perfect intersection of these two as its lead character, Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens, often had to handle a quick new case with eccentric, one-off criminals all developed against the longer arcs of his feud with the Crowder clan, his romantic entanglements in Harlan County, the consequences of his quick trigger finger, and frustrations with his own family, particularly his father Arlo (Raymond J. Barry) whom we meet in “The Lord of War and Thunder” (Episode 1.05). Continue reading

Don Draper’s Plaid Sportcoat at the Movies

Jon Hamm as Don Draper on Mad Men. (Episode 6.12: "The Quality of Mercy")

Jon Hamm as Don Draper on Mad Men. (Episode 6.12: “The Quality of Mercy”)

Vitals

Jon Hamm as Don Draper, Madison Avenue ad man and movie buff

New York City, October 1968

Series: Mad Men
Episode: “The Quality of Mercy” (Episode 6.12)
Air Date: June 16, 2013
Director: Phil Abraham
Costume Designer: Janie Bryant

Background

Don Draper has always turned to the escapism of the movies in times of crisis or loneliness, most notably (and humorously) in “The Good News” (Episode 4.03) when drunkenly accompanying Lane Pryce to a screening of Gamera: The Giant Monster in during the men’s lonely week between Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

Two seasons later, Don is slightly less lonely with his new wife Megan (and his new upstairs mistress, Sylvia) but still frequents the movies whenever he can. “The Quality of Mercy” finds Don and Megan seeing Rosemary’s Baby when they run into Ted and Peggy, claiming to be on a client research mission. Continue reading

The Sopranos: Johnny Sack’s Tan Glen Plaid Sportcoat

Vincent Curatola as Johnny Sack on The Sopranos (Episode 3.04: "Employee of the Month", 2001).

Vincent Curatola as Johnny Sack on The Sopranos (Episode 3.04: “Employee of the Month”, 2001).

Vitals

Vincent Curatola as John “Johnny Sack” Sacrimoni, proud and urbane New York Mafia underboss

New Jersey, Fall 2001

Series: The Sopranos
Episodes:
* “Employee of the Month” (Episode 3.04, aired March 18, 2001, dir. John Patterson)
* “For All Debts Public and Private” (Episode 4.01, aired September 15, 2002, dir. Allen Coulter)
* “Watching Too Much Television” (Episode 4.07, aired October 27, 2002, dir. John Patterson)
* “Whitecaps” (Episode 4.13, aired December 8, 2002, dir. John Patterson)
* “Where’s Johnny?” (Episode 5.03, aired March 21, 2004, dir. John Patterson)
* “In Camelot” (Episode 5.07, aired April 18, 2004, dir. Steve Buscemi)
Creator: David Chase
Costume Designer: Juliet Polcsa

Background

One of the most dapper characters on recent television is John “Johnny Sack” Sacrimoni, The Sopranos‘ enigmatic underboss of the New York-based Lupertazzi crime family. Johnny Sack remains one of the most fascinating and well-rounded characters on a show filled with them. Equal parts cool, menacing, and principled family man, Sacrimoni would prove to be as useful an ally to Tony as he would eventually be feared as a threat. Continue reading

Casino – De Niro’s Blue and Yellow Plaid Sportcoat

Robert De Niro as Sam "Ace" Rothstein in Casino (1995).

Robert De Niro as Sam “Ace” Rothstein in Casino (1995).

Vitals

Robert De Niro as Sam “Ace” Rothstein, Vegas casino executive and mob associate

Las Vegas, Spring 1977

Film: Casino
Release Date: November 22, 1995
Director: Martin Scorsese
Costume Design: Rita Ryack & John A. Dunn

Background

Spring is coming, and that means bright colors… a color palette that few movies have mastered for men’s fashion as well as Scorsese’s epic Casino.

As top handicapper and Vegas casino runner “Ace” Rothstein, Robert De Niro wears more than fifty different costumes, all generally a series of colorful suits and sport coats. Some who don’t know better have criticized the film for this, unable to take the man seriously for his wardrobe. However, Ace’s costumes are a reflection of the wardrobe of his real life counterpart Frank “Lefty” Rosenthal. In fact, costumer Rita Ryack mentions in an interview that the real Lefty’s clothing was even more extravagant than De Niro’s. Continue reading

Don Draper’s New Year’s Eve Plaid Sportcoat

Vitals

Jon Hamm as Don Draper in "The Doorway, Part 2" (Episode 6.02 of Mad Men).

Jon Hamm as Don Draper in “The Doorway, Part 2” (Episode 6.02 of Mad Men).

Jon Hamm as Don Draper, Madison Avenue ad man

New York City, New Year’s Eve 1967

Series: Mad Men
Episode: “The Doorway, Part 2” (Episode 6.02)
Air Date: April 7, 2013
Director: Scott Hornbacher
Costume Designer: Janie Bryant

Background

Mad Men‘s penultimate (or pen-penultimate, depending on how you look at it) season begins in Hawaii during the Drapers’ tropical vacation but soon shifts back to the cold harsh reality of Manhattan in December. While this sort of setting would have been idyllic a few years earlier during the Rat Pack era, it is now dominated by unwashed squatters living with teenage runaways and their violins. Continue reading

Paul Newman as Harper – Brown Plaid Sport Coat

Paul Newman as Lew Harper in Harper (1966).

Paul Newman as Lew Harper in Harper (1966).

Vitals

Paul Newman as Lew Harper, wisecracking private eye

Los Angeles, Late Summer 1965

Film: Harper
Release Date: February 23, 1966
Director: Jack Smight

Background

By the mid 1960s, Paul Newman had proved himself to be one of the most talented – and yet still down-to-earth – actors in the industry. He had racked up impressive performances in dramas like The Long Hot SummerCat on a Hot Tin RoofExodusThe Hustler, and Hud, but the world still had yet to see how well the charming blue-eyed actor could handle comedy.

Around this time, novelist and screenwriter William Goldman was desperately trying to get Ross MacDonald’s 1949 mystery novel The Moving Target turned into a film. The film rights were purchased, and Goldman completed his first ever solo screenplay, now titled Harper. Frank Sinatra was originally slated to play the protagonist, as he was looking for detective roles at the time, but the role eventually went to Newman. Continue reading

The Man with the Red and Black Check Sportcoat

Roger Moore as James Bond in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974).

Roger Moore strikes a pose as James Bond in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974).

Vitals

Roger Moore as James Bond, British government agent

Thailand, Spring 1974

Film: The Man with the Golden Gun
Release Date: December 20, 1974
Director: Guy Hamilton
Tailor: Cyril Castle
Wardrobe Supervisor: Elsa Fennell

Background

The Man with the Golden Gun was the first Bond movie I ever saw. Given that my first Connery Bond was Diamonds are Forever and my first theater-seen Bond was Die Another Day, it’s a miracle at all that I became the Bond enthusiast I am today after starting with these three. (Britt Ekland in a bikini in The Man with the Golden Gun may have helped keep me enthused, though.)

The film’s plot ditches the majority of Ian Fleming’s mostly-ghostwritten finale to the Bond canon, keeping only the primary villain – golden gun-wielding assassin Francisco Scaramanga – intact. The simple story of Bond infiltrating Scaramanga’s organization is replaced with a current events story that weaves in the then-contemporary energy crisis and finds Bond and Scaramanga to be instant enemies.

After some cheeky cat-and-mouse (made rendered by corny jokes, the return of Sheriff J.W. Pepper, and a slide whistle), Bond finally catches up to Scaramanga for the film’s climax on Khao Phing Kan, an island off the coast of Thailand now known as “James Bond Island” for this reason alone. Continue reading