You Only Live Twice: Bond’s Pink Shirt in Japan

Sean Connery as James Bond in You Only Live Twice (1967).

Sean Connery as James Bond in You Only Live Twice (1967).

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Sean Connery as James Bond, sophisticated British MI6 agent

Miyazaki, Japan, Summer 1966

Film: You Only Live Twice
Release Date: June 13, 1967
Director: Lewis Gilbert
Wardrobe Master: Eileen Sullivan

Background

Yesterday was the 86th birthday of the original cinematic James Bond, Sean Connery, so BAMF Style is celebrating with a Casual Friday examination of one of Sir Sean’s final outings as agent 007.

Dr. No and From Russia With Love had been nearly page-to-screen adaptations of the source material. The Bond formula was perfected for Goldfinger and Thunderball, incorporating dazzling cinematic elements and moments reasonably into the intact plot of the novel. You Only Live Twice marked the first major deviation from the source, keeping the general story while removing the more human elements of Ian Fleming’s plot and replacing them with gadgets and spectacle.

The novel finds Bond distraught after the death of his wife Tracy eight months earlier following the events of On Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Given one last chance by M, Bond immerses himself in Japanese culture for his near-suicidal task of taking down Ernst Stavro Blofeld, the megalomaniac SPECTRE leader who engineered his wife’s demise.

James Bond: What’s the plan for me?
Tiger Tanaka: First, you become a Japanese. Second, you train hard and quickly to become a ninja – like us. And third, to give you extra special cover – you take a wife.

The film follows this general path of Bond disguising himself as a Japanese man, but it is treated as much more of a straightforward mission instead of a jaded widower’s final chance at redemption. Rather than a spectacular volcano lair battle filled with identically-dressed henchman and the villain’s last-minute escape, the novel offered a subdued denouement as Bond battled his foe in the Garden of Death, Blofeld’s ancient castle of assisted suicides. Bond eventually kills Blofeld, but the process leaves him an amnesiac, living the simple life of a Japanese fisherman with his now-pregnant wife, Kissy Suzuki, who works to preserve his amnesia and their new life until he begins finding clues about his old life.

The novel’s title, You Only Live Twice, refers to Bond’s process of rebirth, while the film treats it more as a basis for the throwaway pre-credits sequence of Bond being “assassinated” in Hong Kong.

What’d He Wear?

In my last post about James Bond in You Only Live Twice, I mention that his other casual outfit – comprised of differing shades of brown linen – is the superior one. Although I still stand by that statement, this outfit is also noteworthy.

Bond wears a pink linen long-sleeve shirt that is styled exactly like the poplin dress shirts Sean Connery had been wearing since the start of the series. It has a spread collar, front placket, and 2-button turnback (or “cocktail”) cuffs. Since this is more of a dress shirt than the camp-collared sport shirts that Connery wore in this and other films, he wears it tucked into his trousers. Matt Spaiser asserts that the shirt was made by Turnbull & Asser in his excellent analysis of the outfit on The Suits of James Bond.

Bond checks out the tools of Tiger's trade.

Bond checks out the tools of Tiger’s trade.

While a pink linen shirt is a conceptually strong choice for warm-weather casual wear, a short-sleeved sport shirt like the light brown seen earlier, or even the gingham or mottled pink linen shirts that he wore on the beach in Thunderball would have been a wiser route for a warm Japanese summer day.

Taking weather into consideration, the gray wool trousers are also too dark and heavy. Likely tailored by Anthony Sinclair, these darted-front trousers have the same “Daks top” button-tab adjusters on each side of the waistband in lieu of belt loops. A squared tab extends over the front of the waistband, fastening through a hook-and-eye closure on the right side of the fly. The only pockets are the frogmouth pockets on the front with no pockets in the back. The bottoms are cuffed with turn-ups.

Overseeing the ninja training.

Overseeing the ninja training.

Bond wears the same light brown leather sandals that he wore with the earlier brown linen casual outfit. They have a sabot strop near the front, another strap over the arch, and a heel strap to keep his foot snugly in place. With its tucked-in long-sleeve dress shirt and dark wool trousers, this outfit is likely too formal for open-toed sandals, but Ian Fleming – the man who wrote Bond wearing sandals with full suits – would have likely approved.

Bond, Tiger, and Aki.

Bond, Tiger, and Aki.

Different shoes would have made the outfit simply out-of-place, but the sandals are too much at odds with the more formal shirt and trousers. If Bond had no choice but to wear sandals with this outfit, a better option might have been these closed-toe Paul Smith sandals, possibly even worn with a pair of cashmere socks as suggested as a hot fashion trend for summer.

YOLT5-cropHow to Get the Look

Sean Connery always looks cool and masculine, which may trick a potential wearer into thinking that this outfit can be easy to pull off. Although all of the elements are certainly straight from the 007 catalog, the awkward result reinforces the importance of context when dressing casually.

  • Pink linen Turnbull & Asser long-sleeve shirt with spread collar, front placket, and 2-button turnback/cocktail cuffs
  • Gray wool darted front tailored trousers with “Daks top” 2-button tab waist adjusters, frogmouth front pockets, and turn-ups/cuffs
  • Light brown leather sandals with gabot strap, instep strap, and heel strap

The Gun

Soon after Osato identifies Bond by the Walther PPK he has holstered under his suit jacket, 007 ditches his iconic sidearm and joins Tiger Tanaka’s Japanese intelligence community to learn the martial arts employed by ninja commandos.

James Bond: Do you have any commandos here?
Tiger Tanaka: I have much, much better. Ninjas. Top-secret, Bond-san. This is my ninja training school.

The commandos are masters of all forms of combat, but their firearm of choice is the family of rocket-firing Gyrojet small arms designed and manufactured in the early 1960s by MBAssociates (MBA), headed by Robert Mainhardt and Art Biehl. As LittleGun.info stated on its page: “The Gyrojet pistol is one of the strangest and most unique firearms ever manufactured.”

Ammunition for Gyrojet weapons consisted solely of small self-contained and self-propelled “Microjet” rockets ranging from calibers of 6mm to 20mm, rather than standard inert bullets.

Mainhardt and Biehl envisioned an entire family of weapons being developed to use Biehl’s armor-piercing rocket rounds, so named for their method of gyroscopically stabilizing its projectiles. Only the pistol and carbine actually came to fruition, although 13mm models of both were featured in You Only Live Twice.

A production still of Tiger Tanaka showing Bond the capabilities of the MBA Gyrojet pistol.

A production still of Tiger Tanaka showing Bond the capabilities of the MBA Gyrojet pistol.

The rocket propels itself to its full velocity in the barrel, firing at low energy that means very little recoil for the shooter, before the rocket slows down over the course of its trajectory. Initially, this velocity was painfully low but increased over time to around 1,250 feet per second. Although the zinc alloy frame meant a lighter weight than traditional weapons at the time, poor range and dismal accuracy kept the weapon from being considered as a serious contender. Gyrojets tested extremely poorly by the U.S. Army due to being “inaccurate, cumbersome, slow loading, and unreliable” (according to Wikipedia), and the technology was abandoned by all but private consumers by the end of the decade.

Interestingly, the first recorded screen appearance of the MBA Gyrojet was the previous year in Murderers’ Row, a 007-influenced spy comedy starring Dean Martin as the suave American spy Matt Helm. Karl Malden’s character Julian Wall is seen with a short-barreled MBA Gyrojet fitted with a spear taken from an underwater version of the pistol. For more appearances of the Gyrojet on screen, check out the IMFDb page.

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie.

Carlito Brigante’s Brown Leather Jacket

Al Pacino as Carlito Brigante in Carlito's Way (1993).

Al Pacino as Carlito Brigante in Carlito’s Way (1993).

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Al Pacino as Carlito “Charlie” Brigante, paroled nightclub owner and former heroin dealer

New York City, September 1975

Film: Carlito’s Way
Release Date: November 3, 1993
Director: Brian De Palma
Costume Designer: Aude Bronson-Howard

WARNING! Spoilers ahead!

Background

Carlito’s Way is one of the most popular criminal roles of Al Pacino’s later career. Pacino stepped into the shoes (and vintage leather jackets) of Carlito Brigante, the anti-hero of Judge Edwin Torres’ novels Carlito’s Way and After Hours, which were both adapted by screenwriter David Koepp for the big screen.

Unlike the famous drug kingpin that Pacino had portrayed ten years earlier, Carlito is apologetic and remorseful when it comes to his criminal past, hoping to use his street smarts in legitimate business to set himself up for a future in paradise.

Unfortunately for him, times have changed just a little too much and there isn’t enough room in East Harlem for a former wiseguy looking to go straight.

What’d He Wear?

For a badass like Carlito Brigante, a long dark leather coat is essential for maintaining a post-parole reputation in your neighborhood. However, some endeavors – like a visit to your lawyer’s office, spying on your ex in the rain, or a nighttime jailbreak – call for a more practical outerwear garment that won’t get in the way when attempting to free an overweight mob boss off of Riker’s Island.

Carlito wears a hip-length brown leather jacket with a single-breasted 3-button front in a style that was very common during the 1970s. The collar is notched with edge stitching. The chest is split by a horizontal yoke on each side of the front, and the self-belted back is split with a single vent up the center. The plain cuffs are devoid of straps, buttons, or snaps.

Carlito enjoys a brief reunion with Gail.

Carlito enjoys a brief reunion with Gail.

In Donnie Brasco, Johnny Depp (as Pacino’s titular protégé) wears a similar brown leather jacket, albeit with flapped pockets instead of open ones; Carlito’s jacket has vertical hand pockets on the side.

Carlito wears the jacket over a shirt and tie during an early visit to his lawyer’s office. The shirt is a darker, cooler shade of mottled brown with a long-pointed collar, a breast pocket, and double cuffs that he fastens with flat silver oval links.

Carlito takes a slightly more informal approach to meetings than most people.

Carlito takes a slightly more informal approach to meetings than most people.

Carlito wears a wide brown silk tie with a series of tan ovals that alternate between vertical and horizontal orientations across.

When he reunites with Gail, Carlito wears a similar shirt in mottled dark red with no tie. This shirt has an appropriately large collar for the ’70s but the collar points are rounded for a somewhat softer appearance, perhaps an attempt to make the bearded man standing in the rain with a garbage can lid over his head look slightly less threatening. The shirt has dark gray buttons down the front placket and one on each rounded cuff. Like the other shirt, it has a breast pocket.

Our aspiring Romeo must be so relieved that his shirt dries so quickly after an evening in the rain!

Our aspiring Romeo must be so relieved that his shirt dries so quickly after an evening in the rain!

For the aquatic Riker’s Island jailbreak, Carlito wears a plain black lightweight long-sleeve jumper, tucked into his black striped suit trousers under their matching suit vest. He buttons only the center three of the vest’s five buttons.

Carlito looks appropriately nervous, given the outcome of the evening's events.

Carlito looks appropriately nervous, given the eventual outcome of the evening’s events.

The black tonal-striped wool suit trousers are the same ones that he wears with their matching vest and the long black leather coat for the finale. The high-rise trousers have a flat front, slanted side pockets, and flared plain-hemmed bottoms. Through the belt loops, Carlito wears a dark russet brown textured leather belt with a brass half-oval single-claw buckle.

Carlito's trousers slowly begin overtaking his torso.

Carlito’s trousers slowly begin overtaking his torso.

Despite the brown leather in the belt and jacket, Carlito wears his usual black leather Cuban-style ankle boots with high black socks.

Ken Rosenberg, anyone?

Ken Rosenberg, anyone?

He may not be consistent with the leather in his outfits, but Carlito shows a clear preference for gold jewelry and accessories. In Kleinfeld’s office, he wears a pair of gold-framed aviator sunglasses with brown rounded lenses and a brown decorative brow bar.

Gold drips from Carlito's face and fingers while he talks to his attorney.

Gold drips from Carlito’s face and fingers while he talks to his attorney.

From Carlito’s right pinky, a large gold ring gleams with a black square stone bisected by a single gold line. On his right wrist, he wears a yellow gold chain-link identity bracelet. On the opposing wrist, Carlito wears his yellow gold wristwatch with its round dark blue dial and gold bracelet.

Not one of Carlito's prouder moments, but at least you can see all of his jewelry.

Not one of Carlito’s prouder moments, but at least you can see all of his jewelry.

How to Get the Look

Carlito’s outfit of leather, earth tones, and gold makes it quite clear why he was such a popular guy in the ’70s.

Carlito4-crop

  • Brown leather single-breasted 3-button jacket with notched collar, vertical side pockets, plain cuffs, and single vent
  • Dark brown shirt with long-pointed collar, front placket, breast pocket, and double/French cuffs
  • Dark brown silk necktie with repeating tan oval motif
  • Silver oval cuff links
  • Black tonal-striped wool flat front trousers with belt loops, slanted side pockets, and flared plain-hemmed bottoms
  • Dark russet brown textured leather belt with brass half-oval single-claw buckle
  • Black leather Cuban-style ankle boots
  • Black socks
  • Gold-framed aviator sunglasses with brown curved lenses and brown brow bar
  • Gold chain-link ID bracelet
  • Gold wristwatch with dark blue dial on gold bracelet
  • Gold pinky ring with black square-set stone

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie.

The Quote

You ain’t a lawyer no more, Dave. You a gangster now. On the other side. A whole new ball game. You can’t learn about it in school, and you can’t have a late start.

Magic City: Stevie’s Red Striped Shirt

Steven Strait as Stevie Evans on Starz's Magic City (2012-2013).

Steven Strait as Stevie Evans on Starz’s Magic City (2012-2013).

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Steven Strait as Stevie Evans, swaggering and impulsive hotel lounge manager

Miami Beach, spring 1959

Series: Magic City
Episodes:
– “The Year of the Fin” (Episode 1.01, dir: Carl Franklin, aired March 30, 2012)
– “Time and Tide” (Episode 1.08, dir: Ed Bianchi, aired June 1, 2012)
Creator: Mitch Glazer
Costume Designer: Carol Ramsey

Background

As the summer begins winding down, BAMF Style is channeling the effortlessly cool attire in warm weather that the men of Magic City showed off in each episode. This Casual Friday seemed like a perfect time for the inaugural post on Stevie Evans, an unapologetic womanizer who still has some maturing to do before becoming securely comfortable in his own role in the world of the Miramar Playa.

Though his role as manager of the Atlantis Lounge makes him little more than a glorified bartender who’s reduced to making a few extra bucks on the side as a pimp, Stevie seems satisfied with his role – and its many perks – until the events of New Year’s Eve 1958 send him down a collision-course with the most dangerous gangster in Miami Beach.

What’d He Wear?

Red is established early on as a preferred color for Stevie Evans, from the cherry tones of his sleek Corvette to many of his shirts worn over the course of the show. It’s an appropriately attention-getting color for the most brash of the Evans boys on the show.

Stevie spends much of his screen time in the first and final episodes of Magic City‘s first season wearing a cool red self-striped sport shirt made by Anto, the Beverly Hills shirtmaker that contributed many shirts to the show’s male leads. Stevie’s shirt is a luxurious lightweight silk with a notched camp collar and set-in short sleeves.

Stevie feels some conflict as he lights up a Kool for his glamorous stepmother.

Stevie feels some conflict as he lights up a Kool for his glamorous stepmother.

Stevie wears the shirt fully buttoned down the plain front with four large dark red four-hole sew-through plastic buttons visible above the trouser waistline. He keeps his Kools in the patch pocket over his left breast.

His shirt may be red silk but his face totally says blue steel.

His shirt may be red silk but his face totally says blue steel.

Stevie wears a similar shirt in the second season episode “World in Changes” (Episode 2.05), although that shirt is a thicker material with wider spaced stripes and a left collar loop for an under-collar button. In that same episode, he wears it under a dark tweed herringbone-striped sport coat.

Stevie always wears this shirt (and many of his sport shirts, for that matter) with a pair of black flat front trousers with a medium rise that looks low due to Steven Strait’s tall, lean 6’2″ frame. They are worn beltless with two-button tab adjusters on each side of the waistband and a squared, extended tab in the front that closes through a single button. There is an on-seam pocket straight down each side and two jetted back pockets; only the left back pocket closes through a button. The bottoms are plain-hemmed.

Ah, what to do when you run into your stepmother sunbathing nude?

Ah, what to do when you run into your stepmother sunbathing nude?

Stevie’s shoes and socks are also black. He wears a pair of leather split-toe loafers with high, plain vamps.

All of Stevie’s jewelry and accessories are gold. Around his neck, Stevie taps into the Evans family’s Jewish heritage with a gold Star of David pendant on a thin chain. Like Stevie’s other accessories, this was uploaded to YourProps.com by user PacificFan and can be found here.

On his right pinky, he wears a gold ring with a flat rectangular surface that is split diagonally. One half is very finely textured while the other features a small round diamond mounted on a jet age-evoking starburst. (The page for this ring explains that it’s just a gold-colored metal with a gemstone rather than a diamond, but…)

The many cigarettes that Stevie lights up over the course of Magic City give his pinky ring plenty of exposure.

The many cigarettes that Stevie lights up over the course of Magic City give his pinky ring plenty of exposure.

Stevie’s gold wristwatch is a vintage Hamilton Electric “Thin-o-matic” currently featured on YourProps.com. According to the page, “the [watch’s] case and band end piece are both 10K Gold Filled and the band type is an expansion band. The crown works properly and the watch functions properly.”

Constantly lighting up isn't keep his watch too hidden from the camera either.

Constantly lighting up isn’t keep his watch too hidden from the camera either.

Go Big or Go Home

At the outset of Magic City, Stevie seems to be living the good life, unburdened by the responsibilities of his father or more academically ambitious brother. He spends each day easily puffing away on his Kool Menthols – the cigarette of choice in the Evans family, apparently – while pouring out drinks at the most stylish hotel bar in Miami Beach and bedding a seemingly endless stream of beautiful women. And, of course, there is that fuel-injected ’57 Corvette…

Now that's a way to arrive in style.

Now that’s a way to arrive in style.

How to Get the Look

Steven Strait and Elena Satine in a promotional image for Magic City.

Steven Strait and Elena Satine in a promotional image for Magic City.

It may be New Year’s Eve when the show begins, but in the warm locale of Miami Beach, Stevie Evans can dress to look cool and comfortable for a warm summer day.

  • Red thin-striped lightweight silk fitted short-sleeved sport shirt with notched camp collar, plain front, and breast pocket
  • Black flat front medium-rise trousers with 2-button tab side adjusters, straight on-seam side pockets, jetted back pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms
  • Black leather split-toe high-vamp loafers
  • Black dress socks
  • Gold thin necklace with gold Star of David pendant
  • Gold pinky ring with split rectangular surface and small corner diamond
  • Hamilton Electric “Thin-o-matic” 10-karat yellow gold wristwatch with white dial on gold expanding bracelet

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the series.

Limitless – Van Loon’s Blue Striped Suit

Robert De Niro as Carl Van Loon in Limitless (2011).

Robert De Niro as Carl Van Loon in Limitless (2011).

Vitals

Robert De Niro as Carl Van Loon, intimidating and volatile finance tycoon

New York City, Spring 2010

Film: Limitless
Release Date: March 18, 2011
Director: Neil Burger
Costume Designer: Jenny Gering

WARNING! Spoilers ahead!

Background

Robert De Niro has been making the news lately, whether for his political takes or even a fan having calculated the exact year that the actor “gave up” in his career. (2002, if you’re curious.) Let’s shove all that aside and just wish a happy birthday to this legendary actor, born 73 years ago today in Greenwich Village.

Limitless is one of the few post-2002 movies in his career with a pretty positive Rotten Tomatoes ranking (70%, last I checked) with De Niro sliding back into the role of a force to be reckoned with. A powerful, no-nonsense corporate raider with a keen eye for bullshit, De Niro’s Carl Van Loon is the type that anyone in the finance business would kill to work with. When Eddie Morra (Bradley Cooper) get his chance, the two sit down for a Gordon Gekko-style lunch meeting that leads to an impromptu assignment that could make or break Eddie’s future in the finance world.

What’d He Wear?

A strong navy suit, crisp white shirt, and red silk tie is considered a classic business outfit. Sticking within the confines of these few colors, Carl Van Loon allows his expression to come out through sartorial details that one can only see when he allows them close enough to see.

For his first meeting with Eddie, Van Loon wears a dark navy blue lightweight wool suit with tonal herringbone stripes. The single-breasted, 2-button suit jacket has wide and sharp peak lapels with a buttonhole through the left lapel. The shoulders are padded and – in tandem with the sharp lapel peaks and roped sleeveheads – create a strong silhouette to provide an atmosphere of intimidation that Van Loon likes for his lunch meetings… or anyone he meets, for that matter.

Van Loon shoots Eddie a true De Niro Death Glare.

Van Loon shoots Eddie a true De Niro Death Glare.

The jacket has functioning 4-button cuffs, flapped hip pockets, and a welted breast pocket, which catches Eddie’s eye for the subtly luxurious red silk display kerchief carefully folded to poke out.

It's the little things... like a red silk pocket square that symbolizes the blood you'll spill if you cross its owner in a business deal.

It’s the little things… like a red silk pocket square that symbolizes the blood you’ll spill if you cross its owner in a business deal.

The low rise suit trousers have a flat front, side pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms. Van Loon wears them with a black coated leather belt that has a gold single-claw buckle.

Van Loon matches his belt to his shoes with a pair of black leather balmorals with long, pointed toes. His dark socks are probably blue to continue the trouser leg line.

Van Loon's first appearance as he makes his way into the restaurant for his lunch meeting with Eddie.

Van Loon’s first appearance as he makes his way into the restaurant for his lunch meeting with Eddie.

For his lunch meeting with Eddie, Van Loon wears a solid white cotton dress shirt with a point collar and French cuffs, fastened with gold cluster links. While super-slim cutaway spread collars have been very trendy on men’s shirts for the last few years, Van Loon knows what works best for him and eschews the fads in favor of something more personally flattering.

Van Loon’s first tie appears to be solidly dark red with light specks from a distance, but a closer examination (both from Eddie and the audience) when he sits down reveals a very complex pattern of navy, maroon, and white. This woven silk tie has a series of differing and ornate red shapes that encapsulate a white four-dot series or a four-pointed white “floral” burst, all connected by a loose navy grid. There may be a better description for this pattern, but – if there is – I don’t know it.

Couldn't ask for a better shot of the tie. You could probably get a better description than the one I provide, though.

Couldn’t ask for a better shot of the tie. You could probably get a better description than the one I provide, though.

Later, during a meeting at his firm, Van Loon wears the same suit (right down to the pocket square) but with a two-tone light blue butcher’s stripe dress shirt. This shirt has a tab collar with a gold collar pin. Over the pin, he wears a silk tie with a similar color scheme to the first; this tie has a repeating pattern of light blue and tan broken squares, each with a dot in the center that exposes the dark red ground of the tie. The tan squares also have an “X” in the same shade of blue as the alternating squares on the tie.

A production still of Robert De Niro and Bradley Cooper in Limitless.

A production still of Robert De Niro and Bradley Cooper in Limitless.

While sizing up Van Loon’s attire, Eddie’s eye lingers on the stunning 18-carat white gold Breguet Classique 5197 self-winding watch on Van Loon’s left wrist. Like the rest of his wardrobe, the watch looks elegant in its simplicity but a closer look reveals a complex silvered gold dial layout with staggered Roman numeral markings and a 6:00 date window.

Eddie picks up on the details of Carl Van Loon's wardrobe and is immediately able to size up his new prospective employer.

Eddie picks up on the details of Carl Van Loon’s wardrobe and is immediately able to size up his new prospective employer.

One strong aspect of Carl Van Loon’s wardrobe is his brand of individualized fashionability. Single-breasted jackets with peak lapels have been enjoying a resurgence lately, so it’s not surprising to see a slick businessman like Van Loon sporting one tailored for him. Although he doesn’t always defer to trends, he is certainly aware of them. He dresses appropriately for his body type, conforming the trends to suit him as one would expect for a man who can masterfully manipulate most of those around him.

Go Big or Go Home

…and go home in a sleek black Maybach. While more old-school money types may be chauffeured around town in a Rolls-Royce, Bentley, Cadillac, or Mercedes-Benz, Van Loon is seen around the city in a rare Maybach 62, a full-size luxury sedan that was one of the first models rolled out under the Maybach marque after the century-old brand was revived by Daimler.

Van Loon's Maybach glides toward Chinatown to drop off Eddie.

Van Loon’s Maybach glides toward Chinatown to drop off Eddie.

The ultra-premium Maybach would be short-lived, unable to totally recover from the 2008 financial crisis despite (or perhaps due to) it receiving first place in that year’s Luxury Brand Status Index. This provides an interesting parallel to Van Loon’s career, rendered essentially obsolete by the end of the film in the wake of Eddie Morra’s unstoppable success. (Maybach hadn’t even announced that 2013 would be the last year of production until more than six months after Limitless was released, making this an even more intuitive decision than the filmmakers may have even realized!)

How to Get the Look

Carl Van Loon’s suit paints him as a fashionable, confident, and patriotic businessman.

LimitlessCVLblue-crop

  • Navy blue herringbone tonal-striped lightweight wool suit, consisting of:
    • Single-breasted 2-button suit jacket with wide peak lapels, welted breast pocket, straight flapped hip pockets, and 4-button cuffs
    • Flat front low rise trousers with belt loops, side pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms
  • White cotton dress shirt with point collar and double/French cuffs
  • Red, blue, and white complex-patterened silk tie
  • Round gold cluster cuff links
  • Black coated leather belt with gold single-claw buckle
  • Black leather pointed-toe balmorals
  • Dark blue dress socks
  • Breguet Classique 5197 wristwatch with white gold round 35.5mm case, silvered gold dial with 6:00 date window, and black alligator leather strap

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie and, if you see Robert De Niro, wish him a happy birthday from BAMF Style.

Kirk Douglas as Doc Holliday – Gray Western Suit

Kirk Douglas as John "Doc" Holliday in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957).

Kirk Douglas as John “Doc” Holliday in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957).

Vitals

Kirk Douglas as John “Doc” Holliday, hot-tempered gambler, gunslinger, and ex-dentist

Tombstone, AZ, October 1881

Film: Gunfight at the O.K. Corral
Release Date: May 30, 1957
Director: John Sturges
Costume Designer: Edith Head

Background

Today would have been the 165th birthday of Doc Holliday, the erstwhile dentist who shot to Old West superstardom after his involvement with the Earp brothers during the infamous 1881 Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona, immortalized on film in the appropriately-named Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) and Tombstone (1993).

Although Val Kilmer’s portrayal in Tombstone is often called the definitive Doc Holliday, today’s post will focus on Kirk Douglas’ performance which is arguably the first time that the troubled, tubercular gunfighter was accurately portrayed on screen. Douglas brought an emotional depth to a character that had been relatively mistreated and relegated to a stock character in the preceding four decades of Westerns. Although Gunfight at the O.K. Corral was still an uncomplicated film that relied more on folklore than facts, Douglas’ performance helped develop public consciousness of the bitter gunfighter whose best days were behind him and was well aware that he was living on borrowed time.

What’d He Wear?

Kirk Douglas’ Doc Holliday wears a charcoal dress suit and red brocade vest for many important scenes in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral: his on-screen introduction, his knife fight with Ed Bailey, and the titular gunfight itself. The rest of the time, he wears a slightly less formal gray lounge suit – a 1950s costume variation of what a businessman might have worn in the early 1880s. Still, flamboyant Old West gambler that he is, Doc pairs the gray business suit with a similarly-styled brocade vest in green silk.

This gray semi-solid wool suit is styled similarly to his other suit. The single-breasted jacket has slim peak lapels and a high 2-button stance. The lower button is on the natural waistline, which extends around the sides of the jacket (along the top of each wide hip pocket flap) to the decorative two buttons on the back. Each of the two decorative back buttons is fastened at the top of a vent. The jacket also has straight shoulders and spaced 2-button cuffs.

Doc in repose and in action.

Doc in repose and in action.

The suit’s matching trousers are cut straight from the long rise to Kirk Douglas’ natural waist down to the plain-hemmed bottoms. They are flat in the front with frogmouth pockets that slant down and out from the belt line. There are no back pockets.

The trouser belt loops are somewhat anachronistic for a business suit, as these weren’t popular on men’s trousers until the 1920s; Doc wears a black leather belt with a squared steel single-claw buckle.

Doc really takes advantage of the local barber shop.

Doc really takes advantage of the local barber shop.

Rather than the dramatic red waistcoat worn with his charcoal suit, Doc always wears a rich green silk brocade vest with this gray suit. It is similarly styled to the earlier vest, with slim shawl lapels and four covered buttons tightly placed below a low-fastening V-shaped opening. The back is lined in black silk with an adjustable strap that closes through a buckle.

Doc57G-CL3-Vest

Doc wears his gold pocket watch in a welted pocket on the right side. As identified in the previous post (which also provides a great look at the watch itself), Doc wears a yellow gold full hunter Waltham railroad watch on a gold chain.

Other than the differently colored and styled suit and vest, Doc appears to wear everything else exactly the same between the two outfits: the same gray ruffled-front shirt, black string tie, black leather boots, and black gambler’s hat. (When he isn’t wearing the light gray shirt, he sometimes wears a non-ruffled but similarly-styled ecru shirt.)

The light gray shirt has an attached soft turndown spread collar with long points. The ruffled front bib is pleated with mother-of-pearl buttons down the placket. Each squared cuff closes with a single button as well as a button on each gauntlet, which Doc appears to leave unfastened.

TB can be a real pain in the ass... (and throat.)

TB can be a real pain in the ass… (and throat.)

The outfit is also dated by its simple black satin string tie, an icon of the Old West that is best known to today’s KFC patrons as Colonel Sanders’ preferred neckwear. As I wrote in an earlier post, Cattle Kate offers these ties for sale for only $14 with the accurate description of “one long piece of silk to tie into a floppy bow… a favorite of gamblers and gentlemen callers everywhere.” Pre-tied examples are available from Gentleman’s Emporium for $22 as the “Western Bow Tie” and, of course, Amazon for a cool $5.50.

The 1880s may have been the last time a man in a string tie was truly taken seriously.

The 1880s may have been the last time a man in a string tie was truly taken seriously.

Doc’s plain black leather boots have tall riding heels and appear to be worn with a pair of thick light gray ribbed socks.

Am I right about his socks in the photo on the right?

Am I right about his socks in the photo on the right?

Doc appropriately wears an all-black “gambler hat”, a more urban evolution of the low-crowned telescope hat worn by Mexican cowboys in the southwest. The low, round crown prevented hot air from accumulating inside the hat. The telescope hat also featured a wide brim to protect its wearers from the piercing sun; since gamblers spent most of their time inside, the gambler hat featured a smaller, upturned brim like Doc’s.

Two brooding heroes in black hats.

Two brooding heroes in black hats.

More comfortable as a “city dude” than many of his contemporaries, Doc channels more modern gun owners by concealing his Remington Model 1875 revolver in a low-slung brown leather shoulder holster under his left armpit, allowing for an easy draw with his right hand. The holster rig appears to be secured to his torso with a thin strap that enters through his left vest pocket and may fasten to his trouser belt.

Wyatt Earp (Burt Lancaster) eyes Doc's shoulder rig.

Wyatt Earp (Burt Lancaster) eyes Doc’s shoulder rig.

As a flashy gentleman who takes pride in his somewhat ill-gotten material wealth, Doc wears a gold ring on the third finger of his left hand. The ring has a large oval red coral setting.

How to Get the Look

Though hardly a businessman in the traditional sense, Doc Holliday maintains a look in town that infuses elements of his flamboyant personality with conservative business dress.

Doc57G-crop

  • Gray semi-solid wool lounge suit, consisting of:
    • Single-breasted 2-button jacket with slim peak lapels, straight widely-flapped hip pockets, 2-button cuffs, and decorative 2-button back with double vents
    • Flat front high-rise trousers with belt loops, frogmouth front pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms
  • Green silk brocade vest with low V-shaped opening, single-breasted 4-button front, welted hip pockets, and adjustable back strap
  • Light gray dress shirt with turndown collar, ruffled front placket, pleated bib, and squared button cuffs
  • Black satin string bow tie
  • Black leather belt with square steel single-claw buckle
  • Black calf leather plain-toe boots with tall riding heels
  • Light gray ribbed socks
  • Black gambler hat with round crown and black ribbon
  • Brown leather custom shoulder holster, worn under left arm
  • Yellow gold Waltham full hunter pocket watch with dust cover, white dial (with Roman numerals and 6:00 sub-dial), and gold chain
  • Gold ring with large oval red coral setting

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie.

The Quote

I don’t lose because I have nothing to lose, including my life.

Robert Redford’s Black Tuxedo in The Sting

Robert Redford as Johnny Hooker in The Sting (1973).

Robert Redford as Johnny Hooker in The Sting (1973).

Vitals

Robert Redford as Johnny Hooker, Depression-era con artist

Chicago, September 1936

Film: The Sting
Release Date: December 25, 1973
Director: George Roy Hill
Costume Designer: Edith Head

WARNING! Spoilers ahead!

Background

To celebrate Robert Redford’s 80th birthday next week, I’m revisiting one of my favorite Redford flicks. After the incredible success of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and the chemistry of Paul Newman and Robert Redford in the starring roles, both actors re-teamed four years later to play washed-up con artist Henry Gondorff (Newman) and his de facto protégé, Johnny Hooker (Redford).

The titular sting is a con that Gondorff and Hooker expertly organize to swindle crime boss Doyle Lonnegan (Robert Shaw) as revenge for Lonnegan’s brutal killing of a well-liked associate. The con is centered around an illegal off-track betting parlor where the two men pose as feuding gamblers. As the plot thickens, the lines are blurred to the point where even the audience is unsure of who is trying to con whom, leading to one of the most famous denouements in movie history.

For BAMF Style readers fortunate enough to live in the Pittsburgh area, Row House Cinema in Lawrenceville will be showing The Sting during its “Essential American Cinema: The 1970s” week from August 19-25. (The Godfather and Grey Gardens will also be shown during the week. Don’t miss!)

What’d He Wear?

In their guises as slick wire store bookies Shaw and Kelly, Gondorff and Hooker each don a black tuxedo. Fitting for their roles, Gondorff’s dinner jacket has more traditional shawl lapels while Hooker wears a somewhat sportier black dinner jacket with wide peak lapels. The sharp lapels have a lifted collar and satin facings. The shoulders are very wide and well-padded with roped sleeveheads. The jacket is tailored to emphasize these strong shoulders and appear lean through the torso.

Black Tie Guide reports that this style was losing popularity by 1940 when Esquire advised its readers “to stick to tradition to avoid being mistaken for bandmasters, ‘a tribe noted for wasp waistlines, barn-broad shoulders and Himalayan high rise trousers’.”

THE STING

The cigarette girl working the room is another symbol of a bygone era.

The way that Hooker’s jacket shines under certain light suggests the possibility of being mohair or a mohair-wool blend. Appropriately for a dinner jacket, it has straight jetted hip pockets, a single welted breast pocket, a ventless back, and silk-covered buttons. Although the three covered buttons on each cuff is nothing out of the ordinary, the jacket very curiously has a two-button front; traditionally, a single-breasted dinner jacket should only have a single button to close the front. Recently, Daniel Craig’s ivory Tom Ford dinner jacket in Spectre received some criticism for its two-button front.

THE STING

Redford.

Although Esquire would report within a year after the film’s setting that the attached turndown collar had superseded it in terms of popularity, the wing collar formal shirt is the dress shirt of choice for both Gondorff and Hooker when donning their respective black tie ensembles. Hooker’s dress shirt is white piqué with three studs on the plain front bib. Both the shirt studs and the cuff links are black squares with silver trim, although the cuff links are much larger. This shirt has been confirmed as one of the Anto shirts that the manufacturer provided to The Sting for Robert Redford to wear.

THE STING

I did warn about spoilers above, right?

Hooker’s black satin silk bow tie has a large butterfly shape. It is clearly a pre-tied model with the hook visible under the bow (typically the left side), which should be especially avoided with a wing collar shirt when the clasp has nowhere to hide. By the 1930s, it was indeed customary for a man’s bow tie fabric to match the facings of his dinner jacket lapels.

THE STING

Can’t unsee that bow tie hook!

Hooker wears a pair of white suspenders over his shirt. Not much is seen of these braces, which connect to his trousers somewhere under his cummerbund, but the adjusters appear to be brass.

THE STING

Hooker hits the Bushmills after a rough day.

Hooker’s formal trousers match his dinner jacket in a similar black mohair-wool fabric with a single black satin stripe down each side. They have double reverse pleats, straight side pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms with a short break.

THE STING

Hooker tries to keep himself calm as the drama unfolds in Shaw’s betting parlor.

Hooker wears a wide black silk pleated cummerbund to cleanly transition between his shirt and trousers. However, Black Tie Guide found an example from The New Etiquette, published in 1937 a year after The Sting is set, that states that “the pleated formal sash” was only acceptable with a black tuxedo in a resort setting; more general acceptance of cummerbunds was still a decade away.

Black patent leather shoes and black socks are the most acceptable form of footwear with black tie, but Hooker takes an additional step back from formality by sporting bluchers (or derby shoes), a less dressy alternative to the more formal balmoral shoe.

THE STING

Hooker struts back down into the wire store. The shoes worn by men in The Sting must have the loudest soles I’ve ever heard on screen.

Homburg hats and chesterfield coats were the preferred outerwear with black tie during this era, but Hooker opts instead to wear his everyday fedora with a trench coat when venturing outside the gambling den. His wide-brimmed fedora is dark gray felt with a wide black grosgrain ribbon.

THE STING

Hooker gets the surprise of his life in a Chicago back alley.

Hooker’s tan belted trench coat has tartan plaid lining that suggests Burberry. The lapels are wide and often worn with the collar upturned over Hooker’s neck, although he leaves the small double latch open over the throat to expose his bow tie. The cuffs are fitted with thin straps that adjust through a brass buckle, and the ribbed belt fastens around the waist through a larger brass single-claw buckle. The back has a large storm flap and a long vent up to nearly the waist. All of the buttons are light tan plastic, and the epaulette straps are each secured to the shoulder with a single button at the neck.

THE STING

With the collar of his trench coat turned up and hat brim pulled down over his face, Hooker looks every bit the film noir hero as he dashes around Chicago to execute his double-crossing schemes.

Throughout The Sting (and most of his movies), Robert Redford wears a plain silver ring on the third finger of his right hand, which the actor has stated was a gift from Hopi Indians in 1966. We can also assume that he’s wearing the same silver chain necklace with its large round pendant as he wears in other scenes.

As opposed to his usual sleeveless undershirts, though, a white cotton short-sleeve t-shirt appears to be Hooker’s undershirt of choice when sporting his formalwear.

How to Get the Look

Although he certainly wears a classic-inspired black tie ensemble for his days and nights in the betting parlor, Johnny Hooker is still a less polished amateur who was thrust into a world of professionals and, thus, is more prone to breaking a few sartorial rules.

StingRRTux-crop

  • Black mohair-wool single-breasted 2-button dinner jacket with wide satin-faced peak lapels, welted breast pocket, straight jetted hip pockets, 3-button cuffs, and ventless back
  • Black mohair-wool double reverse-pleated formal trousers with satin side stripes, straight side pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms
  • White piqué formal dress shirt with detachable wing collar, plain front bib with three black square studs with silver edge trim, and double/French cuffs
  • Black satin silk butterfly-shaped bow tie
  • Black pleated silk cummerbund
  • Black square cuff links with silver edge trim
  • White suspenders with brass adjusters
  • Black patent leather plain-toe bluchers
  • Black dress socks
  • Dark gray felt fedora with thick black ribbon
  • Tan belted trench coat with large lapels, button-down epaulettes, handwarmer pockets, cuff straps, small brass double throat latch, and long single vent
  • White cotton short-sleeve crew-neck undershirt
  • Plain silver ring (on right ring finger)
  • Silver necklace with round pendant

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie.

The Quote

…I’d only blow it.

Philip Lombard’s Tweed Herringbone Jacket

Maeve Dermody and Aidan Turner as Vera Claythorne and Philip Lombard in And Then There Were None (2015).

Maeve Dermody and Aidan Turner as Vera Claythorne and Philip Lombard in And Then There Were None (2015).

Vitals

Aidan Turner as Philip Lombard, adventurer and ex-mercenary

Devon, England, August 1939

Series Title: And Then There Were None
Air Date: December 26-28, 2015
Director: Craig Viveiros
Costume Designer: Lindsay Pugh

WARNING! Spoilers ahead!

Background

Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None has been one of my favorite books since my sister first innocuously tossed me a copy in fifth grade. She had been reading it for a high school English class and correctly deduced that I would like it. What followed was a night-long reading experience that deluged me into such a state of overwhelming psychological horror that I have been trying desperately to duplicate ever since. It set off a course of events that caused me to eagerly consume as much of Christie’s work as I could, although few works of fiction have ever been able to deliver quite the same effect.

I eagerly sought out a filmed adaptation and discovered – back in the pre-DVD days of the internet’s infancy – that a relatively straightforward English version had been released in 1945, truer to the source than the many remakes in the following decades. I immediately scooped it up and enjoyed the classic flick with its lighthearted gallows humor and romanticized ending that Christie herself had penned for the play adaptation, but I still yearned for the sense of hopeless dread that pervaded the original novel.

Each subsequent and sexed-up adaptation got further and further away from this – placing glamorous actors in a ski chalet, desert hotel, or African safari? – while only a then-inaccessible Russian version from the late ’80s seemed to retain the original gloomy spirit. (Leave it to the Soviets, right?)

I had given up hope as I entered my 27th year until, this February, I received a terrific comment on this blog from Eric Langlois that opened my eyes to a recent BBC adaptation that had aired as a post-Christmas miniseries. The more I eagerly read about this adaptation, the more excited I was, and I set out to get my hands on it as soon as it was available in the states.

Fast forward to mid-April, two months later. My girlfriend, knowing I’m not much of a phone talker, is slightly alarmed to see a random call from me early one evening. I was so excited that Amazon had delivered my DVD of And Then There Were None – and three days early, at that! – that I needed to call her immediately not only to share my excitement with someone but also to explain the backstory of just why this was so important to me. I tried to savor it over three nights as the BBC intended, but I was only able to stretch it into two; I watched the first episode the first night and the subsequent two episodes (and all the DVD featurettes) the following evening.

Philip and Vera enjoy U.N. Owen's robust collection of spirits during their drug-fueled death vigil bacchanal with Armstrong and Blore. While this may not be a literal page-to-screen scene from Christie's book, it certainly illustrates the desperation of the characters.

Philip and Vera enjoy U.N. Owen’s robust collection of spirits during their drug-fueled death vigil bacchanal with Armstrong and Blore. While this may not be a literal page-to-screen scene from Christie’s book, it certainly illustrates the desperation of the characters.

And I loved it. Not only did it retain the original intended setting and bleak ending, but the frighteningly dark psychological horror that used to keep me up at night was piled into the miniseries to create a sense of authentic claustrophobia. You can keep your bloodfest slasher flicks; I prefer to get creeped out by watching the humanity gradually stripped away from ten otherwise “normal” people to the point where the best solution is an apocalyptic coke orgy set to the tune of Jack Hylton’s “Happy Feet”… (okay, the drug-fueled bacchanal was a derivation from the novel but it felt like an organic reaction that reflected the increasingly helpless dementia of these all-too self-aware characters.)

The book cites August 8 as the first day that everyone arrives on Indian Island. The film, which PC-updates the setting to Soldier Island, cites “August 1939” – the same year as the novel was originally published – as the setting. Thus, it would have been 77 years ago today that the ten murderers were assembled for that fatal weekend. (Luckily, several of the great actors that appeared in the production had been freed up to perform in And Then There Were None after their characters met their brutal deaths in the fourth season of Game of Thrones.)

What’d He Wear?

Costume designer Lindsay Pugh has a special talent for dressing well-dressed Britishers in the 1930s, having made a major splash with her work in Stephen Poliakoff’s 2013 series Dancing on the Edge. As she explained when asked to explain that decade’s apparel trends in a Q&A with WWD.com for that series:

Men’s suits were well tailored with strong shoulders and wide lapels. The trousers were pleated at the front, high-waisted and often with a 22-inch hem, turned up.

As Philip Lombard is portrayed here a stylish young man in the late 1930s, Pugh’s conclusions from that earlier production would have again been relevant for dressing the dashing mercenary, whether in his blue chalkstripe three-piece suit, black dinner suit, or the boldly colored casual attire featured in this post.

Philip Lombard proves to be the definitive man of action among more timid guests like Dr. Armstrong (Toby Stephens) and William Henry Blore (Burn Gorman).

Philip Lombard proves to be the definitive man of action among more timid guests like Dr. Armstrong (Toby Stephens) and William Henry Blore (Burn Gorman). (Both Stephens and Gorman are also excellent in their respective roles!)

Clearly a snappy dresser regardless of context, Lombard wears a light brown herringbone tweed single-breasted sport jacket that would be very appropriate for a quiet weekend retreat off the English coast. The wide peak lapels have high, long, and slanted gorges with a buttonhole through the left lapel. The lapels break high on the front to accomodate for the high-fastening 3-button front. Also following Pugh’s noted trends from the decade, the wide shoulders of Lombard’s jacket are well-padded with roped sleeveheads.

Lombard investigates.

Lombard investigates.

The jacket is ventless with a welted breast pocket and straight hip pockets. Although the hip pockets are flapped, the flaps often tuck into the pocket to show just the jetting. There are four buttons on the end of each cuff.

Lombard paces as the group deciphers the identity of U.N. Owen.

Cigarette in hand, Lombard paces as the group deciphers the identity of U.N. Owen.

After the horror of the “guests”‘ situation has undeniably set in, Lombard doesn’t bother to dress any more formal than in a shirt and trousers. Both of his more casual shirts are light blue cotton.

For the first morning on the island after the deaths of Anthony Marston and Ethel Rogers, Lombard dresses casually in his tweed jacket with a solid pale blue shirt. The buttons down the front placket and the single button on each rounded cuff are all gray plastic. The shirt has a long point collar that Lombard wears open with no tie.

Murder most casual.

Murder most casual.

The final day on the island finds Lombard not even bothering with his jacket, wearing just a light blue shirt with a blue windowpane grid. He wears the button cuffs unfastened with the sleeves rolled up his forearms. This shirt’s collar appears to have a slightly wider spread than the other shirt, and the buttons down the front placket are white plastic.

Poldark don't scare.

Poldark don’t scare.

A behind-the-scenes shot of Aidan Turner filming the denouement shows how far his trouser line would fall, thus making both the shirt and pants look baggier and more unflattering to his athletic physique. Of course, given the stress of the life-and-death situation, Lombard may have been worried about a good deal more than his trouser waistline.

A behind-the-scenes shot of Aidan Turner filming the denouement shows how far his trouser line would fall, thus making both the shirt and pants look baggier and more unflattering to his athletic physique. Of course, given the stress of the life-and-death situation, Lombard may have been worried about a good deal more than his trouser waistline.

Lombard wears a pair of bold burgundy fleck flannel trousers with a high rise to just above the sixth button of his 7-button shirt. In a behind-the-scenes featurette for And Then There Were None, Pugh recalls her struggle getting the actors on board with this style:

For the men, it’s very difficult for them to understand because ‘30s fashion was absolutely high-waist in the trousers, which I love; I think it’s very sexy. But men have no idea where their waists are nowadays so they get very stressed about this.

Lombard himself, Aidan Turner, also weighed in:

The pants are a little high for my liking… I have all the costume people comin’ in, and they’re hoofin’ them up all the time and tying the belt a bit tighter and… and it feels so high. Everybody wears jeans these days, and it just feels weird.

Pugh proudly remembers that, after struggling to keep his trousers at the appropriate rise on the first day, Turner managed to get it throughout the several weeks of production. The higher rise also meant a slimmer waistline with a squared tab that extends over the fly to the first pleat on the right side.

He wears a slim black leather belt with a small, silver-toned square single-claw buckle.

The trousers have double forward pleats, with both pleats on either side of the first belt loop out from the center fly. The pleats add more room through the trouser hips with a full cut all the way through down to the cuffed bottoms. There are no back pockets, but the trousers have a vertical pocket along each side seam.

♪ What a difference a day makes... ♪

♪ What a difference a day makes… ♪

Lombard’s shoes are a pair of brown leather medallion cap-toe quarter brogue balmorals with brown laces through five eyelets.

Spoiler alert! (If you haven't gotten around to reading the book in the last 70-odd years. Or even the damn title.)

Spoiler alert! (If you haven’t gotten around to reading the book in the last 70-odd years. Or even the damn title.)

For a brief sequence during the finale when Vera is following Lombard up a rocky ledge, Aidan Turner’s “stunt shoes” are seen on screen rather than the brown oxfords. These are a pair of lighter brown leather plain-toe ankle boots with dark brown laces through five open-laced eyelets.

Lombard's magical oxfords can transform into similar-looking boots when traversing cliffs is in order.

Lombard’s magical oxfords can transform into similar-looking boots when traversing cliffs is in order.

With both sets of footwear, Lombard wears a pair of thin dark brown dress socks.

Lombard’s lone accessory is a simple watch with a silver square-shaped case on a russet brown leather strap. The tan square dial has gold hands and numeric markings.

Any ides on Lombard's vintage watch?

Any ides on Lombard’s vintage watch?

Pugh refers to the gentlemen’s “loose, elegant, hip” look on screen as “a very macho look for everybody. It’s all very trim, it’s all very neat-waisted, it’s very strong shoulders.” Turner himself agrees:

It does give you a good line and a good shape, and you kinda think we have lost a lot… We don’t dress anything like half as stylish as people used to dress. We have lost something in that.

How to Get the LookPLom15Cas-MAIN

Lombard looks strongly masculine and refreshingly casual in a surprisingly bright colored outfit that incorporates trends of the era into timeless, classic male fashion.

  • Light brown herringbone tweed single-breasted 3-button sport jacket with wide peak lapels, welted breast pocket, straight flapped hip pockets, 4-button cuffs, and ventless back
  • Pale blue cotton shirt with long point collar, front placket, and 1-button cuffs
  • Burgundy fleck flannel double reverse-pleated high-rise trousers with belt loops, straight on-seam side pockets, and turn-ups/cuffs
  • Slim black leather belt with small square silver-toned single-claw buckle
  • Brown leather medallion cap-toe quarter brogue 5-eyelet balmorals/oxfords
  • Dark brown thin dress socks
  • Silver-cased square watch with tan dial on russet brown leather strap

While variations of the jacket and shirts shouldn’t present too much of a challenge, Lombard’s burgundy fleck flannel trousers – with their full cut, high rise, and double pleats – are far too unique to be found in any store these days. Kudos to costume designer Lindsay Pugh and her team for outfitting Lombard in such a distinctive and original pair of trousers that are so unashamedly a stylish product of the times.

Interestingly, Agatha Christie provided very little information about the clothing worn by Philip Lombard in the novel. Other than the fact that he wears a wristwatch, her sole mentions of his clothing is limited to a pajama jacket worn with trousers.

The Gun

A production photo of Aidan Turner as Lombard, aimed with his trusty Webley.

A production photo of Aidan Turner as Lombard, aimed with his trusty Webley.

Philip Lombard’s revolver is a beautiful illustration of Chekhov’s Gun (Christie’s Gun?) that serves as a central device for the film’s denouement. Even the mastermind behind the Soldier Island deaths counts on Lombard to bring his trusty heat – and for it to be discovered – in order to facilitate several of the deaths.

As a former guerilla in the service of the British Army, Lombard appropriately packs a Webley .455 Mk VI, the British military’s official service revolver since World War I. The .455 Webley Mk VI revolver with its long 6″ barrel and squared target-style grips entered British service in May 1915 and was the military’s sidearm of choice for three decades through the end of World War II. The revolver’s potent .455 Webley cartridge was developed from the original .455 Mk I ammunition introduced for the first Webley service revolver in 1891.

Since the revolver is central to the mechanisms of the unseen “Mr. Owen”, Lombard was instructed to bring it along in case he expected trouble. While not as concealable for an ostensibly quiet weekend of dinner parties, Lombard manages to slip it into the rear waistband of his high-rise trousers when it’s not packed in his suitcase or stored in his bedside drawer.

Lombard stashes his Webley away in a bedside drawer.

Lombard stashes his Webley away in a bedside drawer.

A behind-the-scenes featurette on the DVD reveals that Lombard was originally scripted to have a “safety catch”, for which Lombard would rudely rebuke Vera for not realizing during the finale.

I'm not sure if Lombard's rude line was changed when they gave her a revolver instead of a semi-automatic pistol (which would have a safety catch) or if they just decided to shave off some of the more misogynist language that wasn't present in Christie's source novel.

I’m not sure if Lombard’s rude line was changed when they gave her a revolver instead of a semi-automatic pistol (which would have a safety catch) or if they just decided to shave off some of the more misogynist language that wasn’t present in Christie’s source novel.

This is the only handgun seen in the film, as it is also the one used by Sam Neill as General MacArthur (not that MacArthur) in his hallucinatory flashback to the murder of Lieutenant Richmond during World War I.

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the series and read Agatha Christie’s classic thriller; it’s the world’s best-selling mystery novel for a reason!

The Quote

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