Tagged: Roger Moore

Commander Bond’s Dress Uniform in The Spy Who Loved Me

Roger Moore as James Bond in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).

Roger Moore as James Bond in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).

Vitals

Roger Moore as James Bond, sophisticated British MI6 agent

HMS Neptune, Faslane Naval Base, Scotland, Summer 1977

Film: The Spy Who Loved Me
Release Date: July 7, 1977
Director: Lewis Gilbert
Wardrobe Supervisor: Rosemary Burrows

Background

For this chilly 00-7th of December, BAMF Style is taking a look at Bond’s post-credits briefing at Faslane Naval Base, designated on HMS Neptune and stationed on Gare Loch as the headquarters of the Royal Navy in Scotland. The submarine-focused briefing Bond receives is especially apropos to this setting, which serves as home to the United Kingdom’s submarine-based nuclear deterrent and was adapted to house Polaris missiles ten years prior to the movie.

Of the 24 Bond films yet produced, The Spy Who Loved Me most prominently features James Bond’s naval service and finds him sporting Royal Navy elements twice: once, as featured in this post, and during the finale when he sports battle dress against Stromberg’s henchmen. Continue reading

Bond Style – Blue in Beirut (The Man with the Golden Gun)

Roger Moore as James Bond in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974).

Roger Moore as James Bond in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974).

Vitals

Roger Moore as James Bond, British government agent

Beirut, Lebanon, Spring 1974

Film: The Man with the Golden Gun
Release Date: December 20, 1974
Director: Guy Hamilton
Tailor: Cyril Castle
Wardrobe Supervisor: Elsa Fennell

Background

Happy 00-7th of April!

Following a lead on the gold “007” bullet received at MI6 headquarters takes James Bond to Beirut in search of information related to deceased agent Bill Fairbanks. Naturally, this being a Bond movie, that search leads him directly into the arms of a slinky Lebanese belly dancer named Saida. Continue reading

Bond’s Gray Office Suit in For Your Eyes Only

Roger Moore as James Bond in For Your Eyes Only (1981).

Roger Moore as James Bond in For Your Eyes Only (1981).

Vitals

Roger Moore as James Bond, British government agent

London, Spring 1981

Film: For Your Eyes Only
Release Date: June 24, 1981
Director: John Glen
Costume Designer: Elizabeth Waller
Tailor: Douglas Hayward

Background

I often cite For Your Eyes Only as the best 007 film of Moore’s era despite many fans’ contention that The Spy Who Loved Me was his apex. After a sketchy start with two OK outings, Moore finally found his footing with a good script and co-star in The Spy Who Loved Me, but it still rings of a disco-enthused rehash of You Only Live Twice dunked underwater. I still like the film, but For Your Eyes Only appeals more to the From Russia With Love fan that I am.

The minds behind the Bond franchise realized (a bit too late) that Moonraker was excessive, even by 1979 standards. Sure, it remained the highest-grossing Bond film until GoldenEye sixteen years later, but are massive profit margins any excuse for a loss of artistic integrity?

Thankfully, the franchise scrapped any ideas of continuing Bond’s space adventures against unkillable giants with the help of just the right gadget. In 1981, For Your Eyes Only marked a new direction for Moore’s Bond: a grounded and (relatively) realistic spy thriller. Continue reading

The Man with the Red and Black Check Sportcoat

Roger Moore as James Bond in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974).

Roger Moore strikes a pose as James Bond in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974).

Vitals

Roger Moore as James Bond, British government agent

Thailand, Spring 1974

Film: The Man with the Golden Gun
Release Date: December 20, 1974
Director: Guy Hamilton
Tailor: Cyril Castle
Wardrobe Supervisor: Elsa Fennell

Background

The Man with the Golden Gun was the first Bond movie I ever saw. Given that my first Connery Bond was Diamonds are Forever and my first theater-seen Bond was Die Another Day, it’s a miracle at all that I became the Bond enthusiast I am today after starting with these three. (Britt Ekland in a bikini in The Man with the Golden Gun may have helped keep me enthused, though.)

The film’s plot ditches the majority of Ian Fleming’s mostly-ghostwritten finale to the Bond canon, keeping only the primary villain – golden gun-wielding assassin Francisco Scaramanga – intact. The simple story of Bond infiltrating Scaramanga’s organization is replaced with a current events story that weaves in the then-contemporary energy crisis and finds Bond and Scaramanga to be instant enemies.

After some cheeky cat-and-mouse (made rendered by corny jokes, the return of Sheriff J.W. Pepper, and a slide whistle), Bond finally catches up to Scaramanga for the film’s climax on Khao Phing Kan, an island off the coast of Thailand now known as “James Bond Island” for this reason alone. Continue reading

James Bond Goes Hunting in Moonraker

Roger Moore hunting as James Bond in Moonraker.

Roger Moore goes hunting as James Bond in Moonraker (1979)

Happy 86th birthday to Roger Moore, who still holds the record for longest tenure as James Bond.

Vitals

Roger Moore as James Bond, British “secret” agent who carries a camera with his “secret” code number on it

“California”, Fall 1979

Film: Moonraker
Release Date: June 26, 1979
Director: Lewis Gilbert
Costume Design: Jacques Fonteray

Background

By the time Moonraker rolled around, the realism of earlier Bond films like From Russia With Love was gone, replaced by near-fantasy adventures of a man who practically introduces himself as a secret agent, is completely irresistible to every woman to every woman in the world, and even goes into outer space. Outer fucking space. Continue reading

Live and Let Die: James Bond in New Orleans

Roger Moore as James Bond (sans Rolex) in Live and Let Die (1973)

Roger Moore as James Bond (sans Rolex) in Live and Let Die (1973)

Vitals

Roger Moore as James Bond, cheeky British secret agent

New Orleans, Spring 1973

Film: Live and Let Die
Release Date: June 27, 1973
Director: Guy Hamilton
Costume Designer: Julie Harris

Background

Ah, Roger Moore’s divisive first outing as James Bond. After getting heat for basing Lazenby almost entirely on Connery’s characterization, the producers (and Moore himself) decided to go a new direction with the Bond character in Live and Let Die. Moore’s “Bond for the ’70s” replaced cigarettes, martinis, and the sleek Walther PPK with cigars, Bourbon, and a Dirty Harry-style .44 Magnum. (OK, so he still carried the PPK at the beginning, but you know what I mean.) Continue reading